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Tag: Self-service terminals

Following its objective of making digital technology more accessible to all, the European Commission has just announced that it is to fund a project which aims to make self-service terminals easier for people with disabilities to use: the APSIS4All project, to which the European Commission will provide funding of €3.41 million.
“Public self-service terminals can be found everywhere, and their numbers keep increasing. Yet, many present a challenge for persons with disability or for some elderly persons, denying them the service”, said Digital Agenda Commissioner Neelie Kroes. As the European Commission’s European Disability Strategy 2010-2020 asserts: “accessibility is a precondition for participation in society and in the economy”.
The project will design and validate, in real-life situation, innovative, personalised digital terminals that overcome existing accessibility barriers. The goal of the project is to propose a standardised framework that could help bank cash machines (automated teller machines or ATMs) and other public digital terminals be more accessible to a wider range of users, from people who are not familiar with the technology, to people with reading difficulties, and tourists who do not master the local language.
For example, tests could involve a programmed card that contains the user’s preferences. When the user brings the card close to the terminals, the machine instantly adapts to the user’s needs (possibly even changing the size of the font or choice of language). Other interfaces could include a mobile phone with accessibility features that enables a customer to purchase a ticket online and pay at the machine issuing the ticket using a secure code sent to their phone.
To access the project website: http://www.apsis4all.eu/

Brussels, 30 August 2011 – An EU-funded project is aiming to make self-service terminals, such as public transport ticket vending machines or public information kiosks and cash dispensers, more accessible for the one in six Europeans who have a disability or the 87 million Europeans aged 65 and over.
According to an EU study, only 38% of bank cash machines (automated teller machines or ATMs) across the EU provide voice capabilities to customers with disabilities, far behind the US (61%) and Canada (nearly all ATMs).
The European Commission is contributing €3.41 million, half of the overall budget, to the “APSIS4All” project which aims to design and validate personalised interfaces, including contactless cards, to help overcome existing accessibility barriers. Trials will begin in cash dispensers in Barcelona, Spain from September 2011 and at ticket vending machines in Paderborn, Germany from January 2012, and will run for three years.
The APSIS4All project sets out to design and validate, in real-life settings, innovative, personalised interfaces that overcome existing accessibility barriers. In a first phase, the project will collect information from 3000 users who will be testing different machines in order to adapt interfaces according to their needs and preferences. Tests will be carried out at 65 ATMS of la Caixa bank in Barcelona, Spain from 1st September 2011 and at 24 ticket vending machines operated by Höft & Wessel AG at Paderborn in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany from 1st January 2012.
The goal of this project is to propose a standardised framework that could foster further take up of e-accessibility features by the ATM industry and service providers. This could ultimately help make public digital terminals (PDTs) more accessible to a wide range of users, from people who are not familiar with the technology, people with reading difficulties, tourists who do not master the local language or even people who may have forgotten their reading glasses. APSI4All will focus on multi-modal interaction and cutting edge technologies such as Near Field Communication (NFC) or short range wireless communication. For example, tests could involve a programmed card that contains the user’s preferences. When the user brings the card close to the ATM, the machine instantly adapts to the user’s needs (perhaps changing the size of the font or choice of language). Other interfaces could include a mobile phone with accessibility features that enables a customer to purchase a ticket online and pay at the machine issuing the ticket using a secure code sent to their phone.

More information
APSIS4All (Accessible Personalised Services in PDTs for All)

The purpose of this meeting was to provide information on the upcoming call for proposals of the Competitiveness Innovation Programme in the area of self-service terminals and assistive technologies and gather ideas from participants in this connection.
All presentations can be downloaded here.

This workshop will take place on 7 December 2009 in Brussels at DG INFSO, Meeting Room S1, Avenue de Beaulieu 25, 1160 Brussels, Belgium.
Self-service terminals (e.g. ATMs, kiosks in train stations, airports, public kiosks in postal offices etc) are rapidly taking over from humans for the delivery of basic services in today’s daily life, however they can be difficult to access and use for many people, e.g. users with disabilities, those with low ICT competence, elderly users, or simply those not used to this medium. This can be improved by adapting the terminals as to their physical design, software and interfaces. Possible solutions encompass among other use of mobile devices or assistive technologies for man-machine interaction, vocal input / output, software adaptation etc.
The purpose of this meeting is to identify grounds for possible further action at European level, notably with support from the European Commission in various possible ways: policy recommendations, stakeholder dialogue, standardisation activities, funding from EC programs, etc.
Registration is compulsory and free of charge: please send an e-mail to eInclusion@ec.europa.eu. Please confirm full name, job title and organisation when registering. Please specify if you will require special assistance.