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We received this request:

Reading from e-documents like journals, books, articles, the text content is now accessible using various assistive technologies like screen reader, magnifier & Braille display. But the visual content like image or graphs or drawing are not yet fully accessible. Some tools and technologies have been introduced in this regard in the literature. But any context related, generalized solution is still missing.

This survey is designed to collect facts about the accessibility of visual elements present in e-format of document. Survey form is having few basic questions based on the objective. It will take just 5-10 minutes to fill the form and submission.

The target participant is any person accessing e-content using assistive technology or people who have such kind of requirement like learning disabled and persons working in the area.The form is accessible through the screen reader like Orca for visually impaired participants.

I request you to participate in the survey and help to decide the right path ahead.
Please forward this to as many as whom you find related with.
Thanks a lot and feel free to give your feedback.

Best regards
Leena Chourey
India

To fill it out, visit:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1wKfVq-6eFKBwEBhjqSw5j8426Lb-ANRw55LPFHP5QG4/viewform?c=0&w=1&usp=mail_form_link

M-Care logo

M-Care logo

M-Care (Mobile Training for Home and Health Caregiver For People with Disabilities and Older People – http://mcare-project.eu/) has just released its pan-European survey among current or potential personal care givers (PCGs) in Turkey, Bulgaria, Belgium, Germany and Greece. In addition, they also contact people with disabilities (PwD), older people, family members of PwD, policy makers, training/VET centres and care centres in order to:

  • identify the needs of the project’s end-users (personal caregivers for people with disabilities and/or older people) and beneficiaries (PwD, older people, family members, stakeholders).
  • obtain a good perception of the need for adjustments in existing PCG training practices to enable the trainees (users) and beneficiaries to achieve personal accomplishment and satisfaction.
  • define a set of learning activities appropriate to and usable across a range of identified user needs.
  • gain familiarity with the nature and potential value of adjustments in training methods and in learning strategies to meet the needs of end-users and beneficiaries.
  • identify and highlight similarities and differences between national contexts in the partner countries.

English

Turkish

German

Dutch

Greek

Bulgarian

This project (M-Care – 539913-LLP-1-2013-1-TR-LEONARDO-LMP) has been funded with support from the European Commission. This website reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

To fine-tune their work, M-CARE (http://www.mcare-project.eu/ – Mobile Training for Home and Health Caregiver For People with Disabilities and Older People) are conducting a survey among current or potential personal care givers (PCGs) in Turkey, Bulgaria, Belgium, Germany and Greece. In addition, we also contact people with disabilities (PwD), older people, family members of PwD, policy makers, training/VET centres and care centres in order to:

  • identify the needs of the project’s end-users (personal caregivers for people with disabilities and/or older people) and beneficiaries (PwD, older people, family members, stakeholders).
  • obtain a good perception of the need for adjustments in existing PCG training practices to enable the trainees (users) and beneficiaries to achieve personal accomplishment and satisfaction.
  • define a set of learning activities appropriate to and usable across a range of identified user needs.
  • gain familiarity with the nature and potential value of adjustments in training methods and in learning strategies to meet the needs of end-users and beneficiaries.
  • identify and highlight similarities and differences between national contexts in the partner countries.

English

Turkish

German

Dutch

In 2014, disabled people continue to face challenges in many areas of their lives. Many of these challenges involve attitudes. But what do attitudes towards disabled people currently look like? This report brings together a range of research that Scope has commissioned over the last two years to understand current attitudes towards disability and disabled people.

This also has a direct impact towards employability.

You can download the report here (pdf).

As reported on in http://www.scope.org.uk/About-Us/Research-and-Policy/Publication-directory/Current-attitudes-towards-disabled-people.

The eLeSI project, led by University and association partners, aims to create an e-learning training resource according to age groups on learning disabilities, pervasive developmental disorders (PDD/autistic spectrum conditions) and/or mental health problems.

We would like to hear from you as someone who has experience of working with people who have special needs in regards to the training you feel would enhance knowledge, attitudes and practice for supporting staff.
Thank you in advance for your answers.

To learn more about the projet: http://www.handiplanet-echanges.info/the-network/elesi-project (other languages available)

Click here to participate and answer our survey.

This project is co-financed by the European Commission under its Education and Training Lifelong Learning Programme (LLP) – Grundtvig multilateral project) over a period of 2 years (October 1, 2013, to September 30, 2015).

The Economist released a worldwide study based on interviews with experts on the digital divide, and the findings included some brand new conclusions. Although many are still urging public sector subsidies to roll out more broadband facilities, the real barriers to adoption and use may arise elsewhere — the ‘social divide’. Large proportions of people not using the Internet do not yet see its value (because good relevance arguments have not been made to them) or believe that they lack the skills (because good digital literacy programs are not available to them). Among these are people with disabilities; the report quotes Axel Leblois of the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict): “Among governments, there has been great focuson expanding the infrastructure to all corners of the world, but less so on promoting actual usage among disenfranchised populations.”
Source: Global Public Inclusive Infrastructure (GPII)