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Tag: Social networking

Recommended read: Lewthwaite, Sarah (2011) Disability 2.0, student dis/connections: a study of student experiences of disability and social networks on campus in higher education. PhD thesis, University of Nottingham.

Abstract: For many young people, social networks are an essential part of their student experience. Using a Foucauldian perspective, this qualitative study explores the networked experiences of disabled students to examine how dis/ability difference is ascribed and negotiated within social networks. Data comprises 34 internet-enabled interviews with 18 participants from three English universities. Accessible field methods recognise participant preferences and circumstances. Data is analysed using discourse analysis, with an attention to context framed by activity theory.

Disabled students’ networked experiences are found to be complex and diverse. For a proportion, the network shifts the boundaries of disability, creating non-disabled subjectivities. For these students, the network represents the opportunity to mobilise new ways of being, building social capital and mitigating impairment.

Other participants experience the network as punitive and disabling. Disability is socio-technically ascribed by the social networking site and the networked public. Each inducts norms that constitute disability as a visible, deviant and deficit identity. In the highly normative conditions of the network, where every action is open to scrutiny, impairment is subjected to an unequal gaze that produces disabled subjectivities. For some students with unseen impairments, a social experience of disability is inducted for the first time.

As a result, students deploy diverse strategies to retain control and resist deviant status. Self-surveillance, self-discipline and self-advocacy are evoked, each involving numerous social, cognitive and technological tactics for self-determination, including disconnection. I conclude that networks function both as Technologies of the Self and as Technologies of Power. For some disabled students, the network supports ‘normal’ status. For others, it must be resisted as a form of social domination.

Importantly, in each instance, the network propels students towards disciplinary techniques that mask diversity, rendering disability and the possibility of disability invisible. Consequently, disability is both produced and suppressed by the network.

Bubbly is a new social media tool that lets users record and forward voice messages to their ‘followers’ — it’s like Twitter, but by voice instead of text (although you can share text messages with Bubbly as well). Since there’s no reading or text entry involved, and no computer or smartphone is required, it may be a way for many new people to social network.

3 out of 10 online over-50s in Belgium (374.000) belong to at least 1 social network. Facebook is the most popular social network in this target group: 47% know it and 14% are a member. Social networks are mainly used for private purposes and less so for professional purposes. For the latter, LinkedIn is the most popular network. Belgium and the Netherlands are trailing behind the UK as far as the awareness and membership of social networks is concerned amongst online over-50s. All this has become apparent in market research carried out by InSites Consulting regarding awareness and use of social networks in Belgium, the Netherlands and the UK.
“Our research clearly dispels the myth that social networks and interactive websites are used only by young people. Today Facebook is popular amongst our over-50s and this will be more so in the future. Many people in this target group realise very well that membership of a social network is necessary to communicate with young people and most simply really enjoy it,” according to Steven Van Belleghem, Managing Partner at InSites Consulting.
For more info, contact Steven on steven.vanbelleghem@insites.eu.
Source: Insites