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Tag: e-Training Courses

The e-Access II project aims to provide users with disabilities, especially users with visual impairments and motor disabilities, with learning opportunities to explore accessible training content and e-training courses. The e-Access II project invites users with low vision, color blindness, and motor disabilities, as well as professionals in vocational education and training fields to register in its web portal. Once they register, they will be able to learn new skills and concepts by downloading accessible training content and e-training courses. e-Access II is a project supported by the Lifelong Learning Programme, Leonardo da Vinci Sectoral Programme of the European Commission.

To register, follow this link.

3 out of 10 online over-50s in Belgium (374.000) belong to at least 1 social network. Facebook is the most popular social network in this target group: 47% know it and 14% are a member. Social networks are mainly used for private purposes and less so for professional purposes. For the latter, LinkedIn is the most popular network. Belgium and the Netherlands are trailing behind the UK as far as the awareness and membership of social networks is concerned amongst online over-50s. All this has become apparent in market research carried out by InSites Consulting regarding awareness and use of social networks in Belgium, the Netherlands and the UK.
“Our research clearly dispels the myth that social networks and interactive websites are used only by young people. Today Facebook is popular amongst our over-50s and this will be more so in the future. Many people in this target group realise very well that membership of a social network is necessary to communicate with young people and most simply really enjoy it,” according to Steven Van Belleghem, Managing Partner at InSites Consulting.
For more info, contact Steven on steven.vanbelleghem@insites.eu.
Source: Insites

GOET logo

GOET logo

The GOET (Game On Extra Time) Project has been funded with support from the European Commission and will support people with learning disabilities in getting and keeping a job. It aims to help people learn, via games-based learning, to live more independently and to help them in their working day.
The project also wants to improve how subjects are taught by making them more interesting and enjoyable. It also supports an accessible approach to vocational skills training, and will be adapting and developing a range of games for computers and mobile telephones that are interactive, engaging and fun.
More information can be found on the project website.

AccessForAll (not to be confused with this webportal) is a framework designed to define and describe resource accessibility. It currently exists as a number of specifications being developed collaboratively by a group of communities interested in interoperable metadata for describing accessibility characteristics of resources and in some contexts related user profile information.
Dublin Core metadata is designed to be easy-to-use and ubiquitous. A single DC term should convey important information that can be complemented by other metadata where suitable. For people with disabilities who use assistive technologies, very detailed metadata about their needs and the characteristics of a resource may be necessary if they are to have good access to information.
The single term ‘accessibility’ has been designed to perform the duties of a DC term for access: it warns users with limitations on their access facilities of potential problems with a resource. AccessForAll descriptions make a much greater difference and are, of course, recommended. A resource may be inaccessible to a user as it is first published, but subsequently augmented by an accessible alternative, such as a description of an image. In this case, the use of the DC accessibility term supports the addition of another term, such as has-version or has-alternative, that points to the new resource that may be useful in the circumstances.
AccessForAll is a new strategy for matching resources to the needs and preferences of individual users, especially, but not exclusively, for those with permanent disabilities. AccessForAll is a general accessibility strategy and the task for the DC community is to develop application profiles so AccessForAll can be realised across all domains in an interoperable way. The original AccessForAll work is the work of the ATRC at the University of Toronto, who have given free access to their work, and is supported by work in other fora in collaboration with the ATRC. The first version was made by IMS GLC for education, and is currently being updated to match the ISO/IEC version.
ISO JTC1 has adopted AccessForAll and the first three parts of the standard are completed. These include an introductory Part 1 (ISO/IEC 24751-1 2008); Part 2 that describes how to write descriptions of user needs and preferences for digital resources (ISO/IEC 24751-2 2008) and Part 3 describes how to write resource descriptions (ISO/IEC 24751-3 2008) for matching them to the needs and preferences; currently Part 4 & 5 (non-digital resources), Parts 6 & 7 (events and places), and Part 8 (languages) are in preparation. All parts of this ISO/IEC standard are to be available free of charge. The AccessForAll approach to accessibility has been implemented in several places, including at the University of Toronto and in the learning management product of Angel Learning.

More information is available on http://dublincore.org/accessibilitywiki/AccessForAll.

A European (Valorisation) Conference entitled “A Job Environment for All” will take place on 25 September, 2009 in Brussels, Belgium. A whole range of projects will present its outcomes, most in direct relationship to the increased employability of people with disabilities. The conference will take place at POLIS, Rue du Trône 98, in Brussels (easily reachable via the metro – station “Troon / Trône”) from 9.30 till 14.30. It is organised with the financial support of the Leonardo da Vinci programme of the EC.

Registration is now open via http://www.phoenixkm.eu/registration.php.

Check and Go

Apr 19

The aim of the Check and go project is to enhance access to workplaces for people with disabilities. With the tools developed in the project, people with disabilities will find it easier to apply for a trainee post or a job in a company. By constructing an individual profile of accessibility they will be able to say quickly and easily what barriers they face and what they need in order to do their job efficiently. In addition, companies that receive applications with this profile of accessibility can easily determine if the applicant will fit into the company and people with disabilities will be able to find a suitable job quickly and easily.

With the Check and go website, people with disabilities, companies, staff managers, trainers, instructors and job coaches can get a three-part product range to learn how they can include or integrate people with disabilities at a workplace more efficiently. These products are:
the Training tool, the Check and go tool and the Advice tool.

More information can be found on the project website.