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Tag: e-Learning

The Lifelong Learning paradigm recognises that, in a knowledge based economy, education and work are integrated throughout people’s lives.

All citizens need ongoing access to learning to enable them to work. Technology is playing an increasing role in mediating this learning. However, if this technology is inappropriate and introduced with insufficient support, disabled people will face even further exclusion from the interlinked worlds of education and work.

To address this, EU4ALL (a four year project which started in october 2006) sets forward the concept of Accessible Lifelong Learning (ALL) uniting 3 key strategies:

1. That the technology that mediates lifelong learning does so accommodating the diversity of ways people interact with technology and the content and services it delivers
2. That this technology is used to bring support services to disabled learners
3. Providing support services and technical infrastructure that enable teaching, technical and administrative staff of educational institutions to offer their teaching and services in a way that is accessible to disabled learners

The aim of EU4ALL is to improve the efficiency and efficacy of implementing these strategies by developing an open service architecture for ALL. To achieve a wide impact the approach taken is not to develop a single EU4ALL system but a standards based framework that facilitates the integration of the approach with a wide range of eLearning systems.

More specifically the goals of EU4ALL are to:
* Design an open service-oriented architecture for ALL
* Develop the software infrastructure for ALL services (including content, support and access services)
* Provide technical standards/specifications for ALL applications integrated with current and emerging eLearning standards
* Validate the results in large-scale higher education settings

Two broad user groups benefit from the EU4ALL project:
1. End-users: Adult learners with disabilities, teachers, and tutors
2. System-users: Providers of eLearning systems, content and services

More information can be found on the project website.

The project will support participants in training and further training activities, in the acquisition and the use of knowledge, skills and qualifications to facilitate personal development, employability and participation in the European Labour Market.

In addition, GOAL aims to support improvements in quality and innovation in vocational education, training systems, institutions and practices as well as enhance the attractiveness of vocational education and training and mobility for employers and individuals and to facilitate the mobility of working trainees.

More information can be found on the project website.

The aim of this project has been to provide access to professional training, and improve disabled peoples’ opportunities for professional employment. It was aimed to be reached by developing a preparation for social work course delivered through a blended training and mentoring support programme, and to test this across three European countries with the intention of identifying cross-national applications for such a programme. It has developed a model of mentoring that involves recruiting disabled people as mentors.

The project has built networks in the sector in each partner country which bring together providers of training, users of training (both employers and potential employees), sector advisory and accreditation bodies, through which the programme can be more widely applied. Furthermore, partnership arrangements were developed with institutions in other European countries to further develop the trans-national element of the project.

The project final results are a curriculum designed to be an ‘inclusive’ preparation for professional social work training. The curriculum is a modular, using a blended learning approach, and designed to be studied prior to any social work/social care training. It can therefore be incorporated into the Widening Participation and recruitment strategy of training providers without making any significant changes to their usual mode of operation. Furthermore, it could be used by associate, or feeder, colleges of social work training providers in support of mainstream teaching, such as the network of colleges working with De Montfort University.

More information can be found on project website

The e-Access II Project provides the technical infrastructure (tools and services) and the training for developing and sharing of Accessible e-Training Resources and e-Training Courses that can be reusable between different e-Training Platforms and Programmes.

The main outcomes of the e-Access II project will be:
(a) the transfer of know-how across Europe on producing accessible e-Training Resources and Courses and providing e-Training services to People with Disabilities,
(b) the validation of the e-Access key results/outcomes in different European Settings and
(c) the transfer of innovative e-Training practices across Europe.

More information can be found on the project website.

The main objective of the project is to establish an educational platform which provides theoretical and practical training for physically disabled people in designing/manufacturing/testing/selecting/repairing of supporting equipment such as wheelchair, prosthesis, elevators, etc.

More information can be found on the project website.

Validating Mentoring 2 project will support the needs of disabled people and others disadvantaged in the job market by developing systems for the recognition of their non-formal and informal learning. This is particularly important for a group that, compared to its peers, lacks formal qualifications with the consequent effects upon their employability. It will do this by establishing new mentoring programmes in 3 countries for disabled people, older people and young people at risk and it will transfer to them the principles and practices of effective, high quality, mentoring and validation, based on the Code of Practice for Mentoring developed the first Validation of Mentoring project BG/05/C/F/TH- 83 300 (www.mentoring-validation.org). In support for the transfer, it will develop and evaluate comprehensive systems for the self-assessment of mentoring programmes. The principles and practices developed will be potentially transferable to other areas of informal and non-formal learning.

This project focuses on the needs of disabled and other disadvantaged people – who gain particular benefits from the non-formal nature of mentoring. It is particularly useful for people who lack work-experience and who have not had the opportunity to develop their full skills and competences, as is often the case with disabled and other disadvantaged people.

The development of a validation system for mentoring will be a major advance and is based on the project team’s extensive experience in this field, which enables it to draw upon best practice from across Europe in all aspects of its work. Without authoritative validation those who participate in mentoring (both mentors and mentees) are denied legitimate acknowledgment of their achievements, and employers cannot properly judge the qualities of staff and potential recruits.

The project is a direct expression of the principles of the Copenhagen Agreement and complements the range of community initiatives that seek to ensure that the benefits of informal and non-formal learning are fully realised as a part of VET.
More information can be found at the project website.