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We would like to invite you to join us at the Interactive Games and Technologies (ITAG) Conference, to be held at the Nottingham Council House on Thursday 22 – Friday 23 October 2015.

Join our community of like-minded professionals

The aim of the conference is to bring together researchers and practitioners to collaboratively share and develop interactive projects and resources in the areas of health, education and disability.

The conference features talks, presentations and workshops from a diverse range of innovative speakers and practitioners who will provide you with inspiration, ideas and practical resources to take back into the workplace.

Visit our website to download the full conference schedule.

Highlights include…

Keynote lectures

“Interactive technologies and developmental disorders: Differences, needs and rewards”

Professor Kevin Durkin, University of Strathclyde
This presentation looks at how individuals with developmental disorders relate to new interactive technologies and considers their needs to make recommendations to achieve accessible solutions to promote well-being.

View full keynote synopsis >>

“Developing Natural user Interface Games for Health without coding”

Stephen Howell, Academic Engagement Manager, Microsoft
This presentation will show how the Xbox Kinect body tracking sensor can be programmed in a simple block based programming language (scratch) to create compelling interactive user experiences.

View full keynote synopsis >>

Workshops

  • Meurig Beynon, University of Warwick discusses his work on The Construit project
  • Explore the path to optimum brain health with Kim Baden-Kristensen, CEO and founder of Brain+

Community practitioner presentations

  • David Stewart, Head Teacher, Oakfield School and Sports College
  • Pip Logan, Associate Professor in Community Rehabilitation, University of Nottingham
  • Anthony Rhys, ICT Coordinator and Teacher, Trinity Fields School /Gesture SEN
  • Michael Craven, Senior Research Fellow: Technology. University of Nottingham
  • Zulfigar Khan, CEO, Great Health Care for the Community, Birmingham.

Book your ITAG Conference place

The conference includes refreshments, light lunch and an evening reception at the National Video Game Arcade.
We encourage you to share details of the conference with any colleagues who may share an interest in the area of interactive games and technologies.

View costs and book your place >>

Got a question

If you would like to find out more about the ITAG Conference, please contact us at itag@ntu.ac.uk. For conference updates, please see the ITAG website or follow us on twitter @ITAGConf. Share the conversation using #ITAG15

We look forward to welcoming you to the ITAG community.

Kind regards

The ITAG Steering Group

ITAG14: 7th Interactive Technologies and Games – Education, Health and Disability Conference
The Council House, Nottingham
16 – 17 October 2014

Now in its seventh consecutive year, ITAG aims to bring together academics, developers, beneficiaries and practitioners to explore interactive technologies and innovate within the areas of Education, Health and Disability.

ITAG will consist of 4 strands: Paper Presentations, Practical Workshops, Hackathon and Exhibition. Submissions are solicited on new research results and detailed interactive expositions related to ITAG, including but not limited to:

Mobile Gaming, Immersive Gaming, Rehabilitation Gaming, Games in Assistive Care, Artificial Intelligence in Games, Robotics in a Gaming Environment, Interactive design with new input/output devices, Ubiquitous computing on our everyday well-being, Interactive street gaming using mobile gaming applications, Gaming Hardware and Software to implement accessible solutions.

Read the call for papers for more information on themes and topics.

Successful paper submissions will be published through IEEE-XploreTM and the IEEE Computer Society (CSDL) digital libraries which deliver full text access to the world’s highest quality technical literature in engineering and technology.

What to do next

Prospective authors are invited to submit a maximum of 500 words abstract for a full paper and 300 words for a poster using the ITAG Abstract Submission Form’ attached to mail you send to itag@ntu.ac.uk by Monday 28 April 2014. Full papers in Conference Publishing Services (CPS) format should not exceed 8 pages in length, while posters should not exceed 4 pages in length. The papers will be reviewed for technical merit and content and the accepted papers will appear in the proceedings, to be published by CPS. Accepted publications are submitted for indexing through  IEEE-XploreTM and the IEEE Computer Society (CSDL) digital libraries. Publication templates are available for LaTeX and MS Word.

Key Dates

Abstract Due Date: Monday 28 April 2014
Full Paper Submission Due Date: Monday 2 June 2014
Notification: Monday 7 July 2014
Camera-Ready Due Date: Monday 21 July 2014
Submission opening: Tuesday 29 April 2014.

The General Assembly of the United Nations will meet on the 23rd of September in New York to discuss how Disability should be mainstreamed in the post 2015 Development Agenda.

AAATE, RESNA, ARATA, RESJA and AITADIS have taken the initiative to support this process by writing a message to the UN Secretary General and the General Assembly.

In the message they commit to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, support the recommendations on Accessibility and Universal Design and highlight the role of enabling technologies in the empowerment of persons with disabilities in order to contribute to the development of their communities. See below.

You can endorse this initiative and add your name and organisation to the list that will be attached to the message.

Download the letter.
Endorse the letter.
List of all endorsing organisation.

Recommended read: Lewthwaite, Sarah (2011) Disability 2.0, student dis/connections: a study of student experiences of disability and social networks on campus in higher education. PhD thesis, University of Nottingham.

Abstract: For many young people, social networks are an essential part of their student experience. Using a Foucauldian perspective, this qualitative study explores the networked experiences of disabled students to examine how dis/ability difference is ascribed and negotiated within social networks. Data comprises 34 internet-enabled interviews with 18 participants from three English universities. Accessible field methods recognise participant preferences and circumstances. Data is analysed using discourse analysis, with an attention to context framed by activity theory.

Disabled students’ networked experiences are found to be complex and diverse. For a proportion, the network shifts the boundaries of disability, creating non-disabled subjectivities. For these students, the network represents the opportunity to mobilise new ways of being, building social capital and mitigating impairment.

Other participants experience the network as punitive and disabling. Disability is socio-technically ascribed by the social networking site and the networked public. Each inducts norms that constitute disability as a visible, deviant and deficit identity. In the highly normative conditions of the network, where every action is open to scrutiny, impairment is subjected to an unequal gaze that produces disabled subjectivities. For some students with unseen impairments, a social experience of disability is inducted for the first time.

As a result, students deploy diverse strategies to retain control and resist deviant status. Self-surveillance, self-discipline and self-advocacy are evoked, each involving numerous social, cognitive and technological tactics for self-determination, including disconnection. I conclude that networks function both as Technologies of the Self and as Technologies of Power. For some disabled students, the network supports ‘normal’ status. For others, it must be resisted as a form of social domination.

Importantly, in each instance, the network propels students towards disciplinary techniques that mask diversity, rendering disability and the possibility of disability invisible. Consequently, disability is both produced and suppressed by the network.

September 6-7, 2012 will see dozens of developers meeting to lend a hand to a wide array of accessibility projects. The 2-day event will match people with coding skills with projects like Global Public Inclusive Infrastructure, writing and testing software in real time. There will be briefing sessions on the projects in advance to draw interest, and on-the-spot presentations in the “unconference” mode. It’s not too late to join us — visit the FCC event information and registration page, and sign up to receive the agenda and updates by email.

Interactive Technologies and Games: Education, Health and Disability 2012

Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham 23rd and 24th October 2012

Visit us at:
http://itag.gamecity.org/
http://www.facebook.com/iTAG.conf
http://twitter.com/#!/ITAG12

Call for papers:

The aim of the conference is to bring together academics and practitioners working with interactive technologies to explore and innovate within the areas of Education, Health and Disability. We have a particular focus on the use of gaming hardware and software to implement accessible solutions, interaction design using new input/output devices and the increasing impact of ubiquitous computing on our everyday well being.
The conference provides an excellent opportunity to showcase practice and to mainstream research ideas and outcomes. It introduces a wider audience to key findings and products from research and illustrates how practice feeds back into and informs research. The conference creates a forum for two-way communication between the academic and practitioner communities and particularly welcomes user led presentations and workshops.
The programme includes presentations of papers, workshops, and an exhibition space for demonstrations and posters. This event is held in partnership with GameCity – the World’s best-loved videogame festival (http://gamecity.org/) and delegates are welcome to attend all GameCity events including the opening drinks reception.

Scope:

As guidance to participants on scope of papers and activities we state that: ‘Education’ includes both compulsory and post-compulsory education; ‘Disability’ includes physical, sensory and cognitive impairment; and the impact of interactive technologies and games on health and well-being is also a focus of this conference. An emphasis is placed on practical applications and guides to where currently available training resources and tools can be found and used. A selection of papers will be published electronically in full, so presentations will be limited to 20 minutes for the key findings, including time for questions from the floor. It is hoped (as in previous years) that the best papers will be published in a special issue of a relevant academic journal.

Previous special issues have included:

  • Journal of Assistive Technologies – Volume 3 issue 2 June 2009 (ITAG 2008 selected papers)
  • Computers and Education – Volume 56, issue 1 (ITAG 2009 selected papers)
  • International Journal of Games Based Learning – in press (ITAG 2010 selected papers)
  • Journal of Assistive Technologies – Volume 6 issue 3 in development (ITAG 2011 selected papers)

Themes and topics:

The conference encourages multidisciplinary papers and examples of themes and topics include (but don’t let this restrict you):
Games Based Learning:

  • Social and collaborative aspects of games (e.g., educational aspects of Massively Multiplayer Online Games)
  • The efficacy of games based learning
  • Self authored content and personalisation in games
  • Learning theory, pedagogy and instructional design in games
  • Motivational aspects of games
  • Collaboration between Science and Art for more effective learning
  • Games to promote the inclusion (e.g., for offenders and people with disabilities, motivation of female gamers)

Game related Technologies:

  • Using contemporary games controllers to create new opportunities in health and rehabilitation applications (e.g., applications for Wii Fit, Kinect. Move).
  • Brain control interfaces to games
  • Pervasiveness and mobility of games
  • Location based services
  • Handheld learning in the classroom

Games for Health:

  • Serious games for clinical assessment (e.g. after stroke)
  • Serious games for rehabilitation and treatment (e.g. of phobias, ADHA, post-traumatic stress disorders, stroke)
  • ‘Modding’ for health
  • Art and music rehabilitation in 3D multisensory environments
  • Games for children in hospital
  • Games to increase physical activity in children

Accessibility and Design:

  • Open source accessibility
  • Participatory design
  • Design for all
  • Natural user interfaces
  • The representation and promotion of gender equality in games
  • Alternative input modalities to games for people with disabilities (e.g., brain, haptic and audio interfaces)
  • Access to interactive technologies for elderly people

Web based technologies:

  • Resources for interactive learning tools and environments, e.g. Flash, podcasts, simulations, mobile games, Web 2.0 tool etc.
  • The Internet as a communication medium ( e.g. for people with Asperger Syndrome).
  • Browser based games and linking into social media channels Submissions

Those wishing to present papers or hold a workshop should send abstracts, to a maximum of 500 words. For those hoping to exhibit or produce a poster, a 300-word abstract is required. The deadline for submissions is Friday1st June 2012 to be sent to: karen.krelle@ntu.ac.uk

Final copies of accepted papers are required by Friday 14th September 2012.
There is a conference fee of £150 for 2 days, and £80 for 1 day registration. This price includes your invitation to the Game City opening event, lunch, and morning and afternoon refreshments.

Accommodation and Travel Links: https://www.conferencebookings.co.uk/delegate/NCBITAGEHD2010
NottinghamCityTravel Link: http://www.nctx.co.uk/

Prizes Offered:

As in previous years prizes will be awarded!

  • Best Paper Award: £250
  • Best Student Paper award: £250
  • Best Student Poster: £150.