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Inclusion Europe

The European Association of Societies of
People with Intellectual Disabilities and their Families

B

Brussels, 5 November 2015

Dear colleagues,

 

On 19 November, Inclusion Europe will organise an important Policy Seminar at the European Parliament, concentrating on Article 19 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and particularly on the involvement of the community in supporting people with intellectual disabilities to live independently. Hosted by Richard Howitt MEP, and featuring speakers including Jan Jarab, Regional Representative of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and Peter Lambreghts, from the European Network for Independent Living, the event will discuss using person-centred planning in furthering the deinstitutionalisation process. The seminar will also draw on the policy input of experts in the field and on good practices collected by partners in the New Paths to InclUsion Network, a project Inclusion Europe has been involved in for the past 3 years.

We would very happy if you could join our event, and disseminate it among your contacts. With many self-advocates in the audience, as well as some presenting, we are trying our best to organise an accessible event, but one that would also bring person-centred planning on the EU agenda.

You can find a full agenda, as well as a registration form here: http://inclusion-europe.eu/?p=1224

We look forward to hearing from you soon, and would welcome your important contribution to our event.

Best regards,

The Inclusion Europe team

INVITATION

The STOA Panel of the European Parliament cordially invites you to the workshop “Robots: enabling the disabled or disabling the abled”

Have you ever wondered how much more difficult it is to live with a disability? Do you care about equal rights and accessibility for everyone?
What assistive technologies can be used to create an inclusive environment for persons with disabilities in society, education and employment?
What if, in the near future, robots render the division between abled-bodied and disabled persons irrelevant?

Find out about these questions and many more at our workshop

Please register here by 16 June 2015

Webstreaming available

Zero Project Logo
The Zero Project researches the status of the implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), this year with a focus on independent living and political participation. Data on 150 countries were collected, together with 50 Innovative Practices and Policies that can be considered as worldwide role models in their fields.
Find the whole Zero Project Report online at http://www.zeroproject.org. The website also gives you the opportunity to research Social Indicators in all 150 countries on world maps, or to search the database for all the Innovative Practices and Policies that have been analysed and selected since 2013: Employment (2013), Accessibility (2014) and now Independent Living and Political Participation.
The Zero Project takes a network approach. In the last three years, more than 3,000 experts around the world have contributed with their knowledge and expertise.

The European Commission estimates that 80 million people in the EU have disabilities, and face a number of challenges that hamper their daily activities and hinder their social inclusion. To tackle some of these challenges, the European Commission prepared a proposal for a European Accessibility Act in 2013, which complements the existing EU legal framework in this field and support the creation of a market for accessible goods and services.

European Accessibility Act

The Amóvil website, in collaboration with the Vodafone Spain Foundation, has made available a free online self-training course to help users learn how to test a mobile device for accessibility compliance.

The course provides a set of guidelines that are based on the principles of Universal Accessibility and Design for All. These guidelines describe the requirements mobile devices must comply with in order to be accessible to persons with disabilities. In addition, descriptions of each disability profiles as well as the barriers these users tend to face when dealing with technology are provided.

This course, which is available at Amóvil blog site, aims to be a comprehensive introduction to inclusive mobile design. It is also intended to encourage developers to keep disabled and elderly people in mind when designing mobile devices.

Actual tests of websites on e-accessibility in all EU member states plus Norway, USA, Canada and Australia took place, and were published.

The report is based on the international guidelines WCAG 2.0. This means that the study mainly concerns the technology and doesn’t cover cognitive aspects, content or on how interfaces work on mobile devices nor the accessibility in documents. The report thus can’t be read as an absolute measure of web-accessibility, but more like a temperature check based on cluster sampling.

The overall result of the survey is a disappointment. Relatively easy things fail in many places, for example marking up the headings properly. More recent requirements, which came with WCAG 2.0 in 2008, are even less implemented.

There are differences between the countries, but, there is no country which can be described as good. We were hoping that the EU member states would learn from each other and be inspired from good examples, but that doesn´t seem to be the case.

One conclusion is that the most successful countries are those who have managed to combine several things:
– Legislation or policy which is not too technically detailed but more focused on individual rights;
– A well developed industry with a high level of accessibility competence, also among end user organizations.