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Category: personal care

EPR and EDF are pleased to invite you to

an interactive event on the topic of co-production

What is co-production and how does it relate to empowerment?
What does co-production look like in practice?
What are the barriers to empowering co-production practices and how can they be overcome?

These are some of the questions that will be addressed during the afternoon.

EPR worked with researchers from the European Network for Independent Living to develop the concept for a study which aims to analyse good practices from EPR members in the field of co-production of services, focusing on people with disabilities.

For the study, ‘co-production’ is understood to mean equal partnership and collaboration between service providers and people using services. Co-production is about recognising that people who use services are experts in their own right, rather than passive recipients of care, and about involving them in the shaping of services. Co-production practices can be applied at all stages of service delivery – in the planning, design, delivery and evaluation of services.

The findings of the study and some examples will be presented.

Key actors representing service providers and service users will contribute to the discussions. In the spirit of co-production, all participants will be facilitated to engage in the debate and develop recommendations for next steps.

The draft programme will be published in the coming days.
This event is open to all interested stakeholders.
Registration is mandatory

H-CARE project is organising its final European Conference on 27/05/2016 from 9 h 00 – 15 h 00 at NH Brussels Du Grand Sablon, located in Brussels, Rue Bodenbroek 2/4.

“New competencies of salespersons of assistive technologies and food supplements in favour of European customers”

Registration is available via http://emanet.org/events/hcare-conference/

AGENDA

  • 08:00 – 09:00 Registration of the participants
  • 09:00 – 09:15 Welcome – Mrs. Figen Sekin, Istanbul National Educational Directorate, Turkey; Prof. Dr. Vincenzo Costigiola, European Medical Association, Belgium
  • 09:15 – 09:45 Presentation of the H-CARE project concept and outcomes – Mrs. Figen Sekin, Project Coordinator (IMEM, Turkey) / Mr. Andrean Lazarov, VET expert (VET center ZGURA-M, Bulgaria)
  • 09:45 – 10:05 Presentation of the job profile “Salespersons of assistive technologies and food supplements” – Mrs. Penka Nikolova / Mr. Vladimir Borisov, National Agency for vocational education and training, Bulgaria
  • 10:05 – 10:25 Presentation of the pilot phase in Austria together with piloters’ testimonials – Mag. Gabriela Maderthaner / Mag. Gregor Höller, (BFI VET Institute, Austria)
  • 10:25 – 10:45 Presentation of the pilot phase in Romania together with piloters testimonials – Prof. PhD Margareta Gabriela Chobanu, (Technical University “G. Asachi, Romania)
  • 10:45 – 11:15 Coffee break & Networking
  • 11:15 – 11:35 Presentation of the pilot phase in Bulgaria together with piloters testimonials – Mrs. Petya Grudeva (VET Center ZGURA-M), Mrs. Pepa Vasileva – Ministry of Health, Bulgaria, Mrs. Maria Spasova, National Association of the health care professsionals, Bulgaria
  • 11:35 – 11:50 Presentation of the pilot phase in Turkey together with piloters’ testimonials – Mrs. Figen Sekin, (Istanbul National Educational Directorate, Turkey)
  • 11:50 – 12:10 Importance of vocational education in combination with e-learning – the future of blended learning – Dr. Plank, VET expert, Austria
  • 12:10 – 12:30 The importance of the job profile for Bulgarian assistive technologies market – Mrs. Teodora Sindzhirlieva, National Agency of people with disabilities, Bulgaria
  • 12:30 – 12:45 Risks and benefits from food supplements, M.D. Prof. Madjit Kadim, Plovdiv Medical University Hospital, Bulgaria
  • 12:45 – 13:00 Trends in contemporary vocational education and training, Prof. David French, Mrs. Sue Burt – VET consultants, United Kingdom
  • 13:00 – 13:30 Discussion
  • 13:30 – 15:00 Demonstration of H-CARE products, networking and buffet
M-CARE logo

M-CARE logo

On 1 December 2015, the final M-CARE conference will be organised in Brussels, Belgium at VLEVA premises.

The event “Caring for people with disabilities and older people: challenges, opportunities and (mobile/online) training solutions” will focus on the importance of good quality personal caregiving (PCG) for people with disabilities and older people. Focus will be on caring in a broader perspective, and how M-CARE’s (mobile/online) training solutions contribute to successful PCGs.

Target groups:

  • (Potential) personal assistants/personal caregivers
  • Nurses
  • Social workers
  • People with disabilities
  • Parents/friends/colleagues
  • Representative organisations of people with disabilities
  • Policy makers

Where?:

Vlaams-Europees verbindingsagentschap vzw (please download the itinerary)
Kortenberglaan 71
1000 Brussels
Belgium

Practicalities:

English is the used language.
Premises are wheelchair accessible.

​Registration:

Attendance is free but registration is obligatory, and is possible via the project website. Any other costs incurred in participating to this event (hotel, travel, subsistence, etc.) must be paid for by the attendee.

INVITATION

The STOA Panel of the European Parliament cordially invites you to the workshop “Robots: enabling the disabled or disabling the abled”

Have you ever wondered how much more difficult it is to live with a disability? Do you care about equal rights and accessibility for everyone?
What assistive technologies can be used to create an inclusive environment for persons with disabilities in society, education and employment?
What if, in the near future, robots render the division between abled-bodied and disabled persons irrelevant?

Find out about these questions and many more at our workshop

Please register here by 16 June 2015

Webstreaming available

What is the new role of organisations that want to be of support for persons with disabilities? What do users want service providers to do to promote inclusion and implement the principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD)? There is a need to reinforce cooperation between persons with disabilities, public authorities and support services organisations to develop comprehensive policies and to facilitate the right support services. EASPD is organising a panel debate with Members of the European Parliament, Disable Persons Organisations (DPOs) and support services organisations on how to reinforce “Users’ involvement in all aspects of support services”.

A theoretical concept has been created to define the new way of developing support for persons with disabilities: “Co-production”. This term refers to a method and the kind of social services needed to come with a more inclusive society. Freedom of choice for the users, individualised care support services and a very strong cooperation between all stakeholders involved to design, develop and deliver the services. As for the cinematographic sector, in the delivery of services sector, every link in the production chain is vital to have the best result possible with the highest quality.

The event will be part of the EASPD multiannual strategy to reach out to all actors in society promoting inclusion through high quality services. EASPD has already started to implement the strategy by consulting European umbrella disabled people organisations (DPOs). This event will also be a great opportunity to present the results of the research paper on the situation of the workforce in the health and care sector across Europe.

Therefore, EASPD is organising a panel debate with the Members of the European Parliament, the organisations representing persons with disabilities and service providers on how to reinforce “Users’ involvement” in all aspects of service provision.

This event will take place the 2nd June 2015 from 09h00 to 13h00 and will be a great opportunity to address:

- EASPD multiannual strategy implementation: Reaching Out
- The research paper “Strengthening the workforce for people with disabilities: Initial mapping across Europe”
- The list of questions published by the United Nations following up the evaluation of the report submitted by the European Union on the implementation of the CRPD.
- Coproduction and the implementation plan of the European Disability Strategy

Practical information

- Full programme of the Hearing
- Concept Note
- To register or receive more information, please contact Nieves Tejada, EASPD Communications Officer

What is the situation for the workforce in the health and care sectors? Are there common trends in Europe when it comes to wages, working conditions and staff training requirements? How have budgetary cuts impacted the sector? Following the establishment of the European Observatory of Human Resources in 2014, EASPD now presents the first results of the research conducted by Prof. Dr. Jane Lethbridge. It maps the training and educational requirements in the disability sector, the workforce situation and future job creation potential of the social service provision.

The social care workforce for persons with disabilities and senior citizens is one of the fastest growing sectors in terms of employment expansion in Europe. However, there are unmistakable signs that austerity measures are hindering this expansion, even though demand for social services will remain high, in light of Europe’s ageing population. Budget reductions are affecting not only the availability and affordability of the services, but also the working conditions and overall quality of services. Whilst results minutely varied from one European country to another, this research shows that altogether, the sector is characterised by high training needs, low pay jobs, low status and part-time hour contracts.

Similar trends in Europe

This research has identified similar trends across Europe that must be addressed to secure a high quality, motivated and trained workforce in order to deliver first-rate services, fully adapted to the needs of persons with disabilities.

Recruitment procedures, staff shortages and lack of training standards:

36% of the study’s respondents reported that no qualifications were necessary to start working in social care at entry-level, as opposed to the 44% that reported a vocational qualification was compulsory. Nevertheless in almost all countries basic care workers must have acquired secondary-level education in order to receive employment. In many European countries, the shortage of social care workers and/or the low standards of recruitment, result in the employment of unqualified staff. The lack of social workers is particularly affecting rural areas.

Whilst in Western European countries, new systems of training are being introduced (Germany, the Netherlands), in Central and Eastern Europe attempts have been made to improve the level of credentials needed to qualify for employment in the sector (Hungary). There is not the same trend towards improved levels of training though. In England there was an attempt to introduce a national vocational qualification for all care workers, but it was abandoned because of the difficulties in recruiting staff, due to budgetary cuts. In some countries such as Austria, contracts between service providers and regional authorities define the level of qualifications, with this ratio increasingly being determined by the level of funding. The research concludes that there are some measures in place to improve the level of qualifications, but low wages in the sector makes it difficult to recruit in many countries. In Bulgaria for example, social workers can be paid less than 1 € per hour. Moreover, the impact of austerity policies on budgets for social care is resulting in pressure to reduce staff costs, either through reducing the level of qualifications required or through lower wages. Consequently applicants can enter care work without any relevant qualifications or experience, and in some cases organisations are required to train them.

The disability sector is undergoing extensive changes such as the move from a medical model to a social model, more in line with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Therefore, there is an ever-important need for training in all categories of the social sector’s workforce, as reported by the majority of the study’s respondents (61% of the services providers and 78% of the umbrella organisations).

Workforce mobility:

Despite the existence of several barriers (language skills, transferability of qualifications), there is a gradually increasing trend for social care workers to cross borders to find work. When analysing mobility, it is also important to take into account the economic situation of the sector in each country. The research shows two main trends: Firstly, European countries experiencing “care drain”, where qualified care workers are moving to other countries to find better paid work. This situation damages organisations in the country of origin, as they used their resources to train future migrant workers. Secondly, European countries in need of social care workers where public allowances for care are sometimes used to informally employ a migrant worker without training or employment security.

7 Recommendations for the Sector:

- Training at EU level: minimum skills for working with people with disabilities should be validated across Europe, including involving users in training.
- Quality control and clear measures to define quality in services: development of a general funding standard and quality framework for services at European level.
- Share experiences and innovative practices on recruitment and induction across Europe to improve standards of care services.
- Reinforce the consultation process between national governments and service providers to show to decision makers the importance of pay and working conditions in the social care sector.
- Identify the successful and unsuccessful policies at the national level.
- Establish a “culture of learning” to have a trans-national consensus on the skills needed to work with people with disabilities.
- Development of the European Care Certificate and supporting e-learning initiatives.

The disability sector faces several challenges to the future of service provision. The supply of a well-trained, experienced workforce will be essential, and will depend upon two essential aspects: funding opportunities and political will. There is a job creation potential to be explored in the sector.