Skip to content

Archive

Category: Technology

A newly adopted report by the Foreign Affairs Committee of the European Parliament calls for accessibility to become a major criterion in EU supported investments under the new 7 year EU budgetary framework.

In the context of the current negotiations on a new 7 year EU budgetary framework (2014-2020), the European Parliament and the EU Member States are negotiating both the size as well as the implementing modalities of that framework. Part of that deal which is expected to be hammered out early next year, is a budget line on external policies.

In the area of foreign policies, discussions are underway to adopt common implementing rules defining the same implementing principles for all instruments.

The report stresses the need for accessibility to become a criterion in the area of public procurement procedures. This would ensure that all EU supported investments in partner countries have to explain in how far they respect those standards. In the field of EU external policies, this would be a first.

The report reads: “Tenderers, applicants and candidates who have been awarded contracts shall respect applicable environmental legislation including multilateral environmental agreements, internationally agreed core labour standards and the principles of non discrimination and, to the maximum extent possible, accessibility for people with disabilities.”

Source: CBM

WCAG-EM describes an approach for evaluating how websites – including web applications and websites for mobile devices – conform to Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0. It covers different situations, including self-assessment and third-party evaluation. It is independent of particular evaluation tools, web browsers, and assistive technologies. This draft has proposed content for all sections. Now is a good time to review it. In particular, feedback is sought on the applicability of this methodology in practice and for input on refining and expanding the guidance provided.

Contact: Please send comments on this draft document to the publicly archived mailing list: public-wai-evaltf@w3.org by 20 October 2012.

On 22 January 2013, the conference “Accessible ICT: Priorities for Future Research on Accessible Information and Communication Technology Systems and Services” will take place at the Institution of Engineering and Technology, 2 Savoy Place, London WC2R 0BL.

The aim of this conference is to obtain a consensus on priorities for future research on accessible information and communication technology systems and services. Funding bodies need to ascertain the best strategy for investing their finite resources in research and development to benefit disabled and elderly people. The scope will include network-based services (social networks, collective intelligent systems, augmented reality, cloud computing, advanced location aware services and ambient intelligent systems) as well as novel user interfaces and technology transfer.

Speakers include Mike Short, Brian Collins, Gregg Vanderheiden, Graham Worsley, Patrick Roe, Alan Newell, Deborah Pullen, Gunela Astbrink and Guido Gybels.

The agenda can be found here.

To register for this conference, please click here.

The RECALL Stakeholder Event takes place at the Deaf Cultural Centre, Ladywood Road, Birmingham B16 8SZ, on 16th October, 2012 from 9:30am – 12:30pm (lunch included).

Route Mate is an Android application that uses location-based services (e.g. GPS & Google Maps) to help route learning for people with intellectual disabilities and/or additional sensory impairments. The application allows students to plan their own journeys with the help of a trainer. They can plan destination/departure points, points of interest on route, enter the number of an emergency contact and practise walking routes until they become familiar with them.
Route Mate is developed by experts at Nottingham Trent University and tested by people with a range of disabilities across the partner organisations of UK, Greece, Romania & Bulgaria.

Programme

  • 9:30am: Arrival, registration & refreshments
  • 10:00am: Welcome & overview of the project
  • 10:15am – 11am: Demonstration by application developer
  • 11:30am – 12pm: Workshop activities
  • 12:00pm: Lunch & networking

Who should attend?: Are you involved in supporting students to gain independent travel skills? Do you work with students who have always been provided transport and now need extra support before accessing college or employment? This is the event for you.
Why should I attend?: Free route planning software, see a demonstration of the technology, talk to the developers, users and testers.

There is no charge to attend the exhibition, but as places are limited, those wishing to attend should contact Jo Reilly by email at jo.reilly@bid.org.uk for a booking form as soon as possible. Please note there are no walk-ins permitted.

Visit http://recall-project.eu and http://isrg.org.uk for further information about this project.

The AbleGamers Foundation is pleased to announce the unveiling of Includification – a 48 page, fully illustrated how-to guide for videogame developers and publishers road-mapping the exact solutions needed to design an accessible game.
“For nearly a decade, our organization has been reaching out to developers convincing them they need to include accessibility for gamers with disabilities,” said Mark Barlet, President and Founder of the AbleGamers Foundation. “As that message has been increasingly accepted in the video game industry, the question has slowly turned into “Okay, we need to make our games accessible, but how?””
“We believe this document and its companion website www.includification.com will serve to answer any questions a developer might have about the solutions needed to make their games accessible to the disability community,” continued Mr. Barlet. “What thrills me the most is that our recommendations can be updated via the website as new technology and information arises. The videogame industry is a living breathing entity and we need to treat it as such by updating information as it comes in.”
“Words cannot express how extremely proud I am of this document, this organization and everyone who helped bring this together. This is the culmination of the hard work and dedication everyone at our nonprofit has put in over the last 8 years,” said Steve Spohn, Editor-in-Chief of AbleGamers.com “It is my sincerest wish that a copy of this document sits on the desk of every developer, in the resource area of every library and with every major publisher across the world. It’s time game accessibility leaped to the next level and these guidelines show developers exactly how to enable gamers with disabilities in the easiest, most efficient and cost-effective manner possible.”

The AbleGamers publication, Includification, includes numerous detailed explanations of common problems for gamers with disabilities, solutions for those problems, printable checklists, developer exercises and personal letters from industry insiders to the game industry.
Download Includification for free.

The 2012 CRPD Progress Report includes the latest data on 52 countries representing 77.4 percent of the World Population. The report offers disability advocates, governments, civil society and international organizations — monitoring the progress of the implementation of the Convention by States Parties — a unique benchmarking tool that collects data on country laws, policies, and programs pertaining to accessible and assistive Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) around the globe. All results are available cross-tabulated by region, level of income per capita of Human Development Index to facilitate benchmarking by advocates and policy makers.