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Category: Design for all

The One Voice for Accessible ICT Coalition has published a report that analyses all the key issues relating to mobile apps for older and disabled people. The report is available in the One Voice website.
The same website also provides the First Seven Steps to accessible mobile apps.

Mailing by AEGIS project

We would like to introduce you to our Open Accessibility Everywhere Group (OAEG) which you may reach at http://www.oaeg.eu/.

This is an effort that is taking place in the context of the AEGIS IP project, which is running its fourth and last year of life.

OAEG aims to collect and provide information on Open Source Accessibility in various ways, through mobility schemes, through its Open Source Accessibility Repository, through its Blog Aggregator and its Open Accessibility Framework linked to AEGIS semantics.

Feel free to go and visit our site and join our blog aggregator, search the solutions in the repository and upload your own one, comment our content and come back to us through our on-line forms in each section or directly at OAEG-RSVP@aegis-project.eu.

As AEGIS is approaching its end (end of August 2012), we hope this will be an opportunity for us all to be in communication with you and plan together our common future research roadmap.

Following videos we made at WSIS 2012, Geneva, Switzerland, give a good impressions of the work that is done on understanding and providing accessible education worldwide.

The first video features Jutta Treviranus (IDRC) on FLOE and Open Educational Resources at WSIS 2012.

The second video features Axel Leblois (Executive Director G3ict) on Lifelong Learning with Assistive Technologies at WSIS 2012.

We hope to publish some more videos in the next few days.

For a second year, the Vodafone Foundation in collaboration with AGE and the European Disability Forum (EDF) will launch the Smart Accessibility Awards. This contest aims to increase understanding of the needs and expectations of ageing and disabled users of smartphones by inviting developers to create innovative applications that are designed for all. Like in 2011 four applications that fill in the criteria of effectiveness, availability and affordability, user-friendliness, usability, accesssibility and design for all, will win a prize of 50.000 Euros each. The competition will be officially launched in Brussels on 30th May.

Date: Wednesday, 30 May
Venue: Hotel Sofitel Brussels Europe, Place Jourdan 1 – 1040 Brussels, Belgium
Time: 14.00hrs-16.00hrs
If you would like to join the launch please mail Cindy De Koninck.

Farfalla is a web application for enhancing accessibility of any website. It is meant to be easy to configure and to use. It wants to provide users with a lightweight and flexible solution, which can be always available in the cloud, for free.

You can try it right now via the Farfalla website: you only have to click on the bar on the upper-right part of the page to select a profile. Every profile allows accessing different kinds of resources, from text magnification to an onscreen keyboard.

They will add more tools in the future, so if you can’t find anything useful, you could try contacting them and explaining your needs.

Farfalla is based on free technologies such as jQuery, jQuery-UI, PHP and MySQL. Farfalla is Free Software. Its source code is distributed under the GNU Affero General Public License (GNU AGPL). The main developer is Andrea Mangiatordi.

Twitter: http://twitter.com/farfallaproject

Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities is a joint report of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and G3ict. Researched and Edited by the Center for Internet & Society, and was released in November 2011.

Mobile communications have become in less than two decades omnipresent in all countries, reaching out to the most isolated and underserved populations in developed and developing countries alike. In 2011more than 5.4 billion mobile phones are in use, almost one per human being on the planet.

In the midst of this telecommunication revolution, however, populations of senior citizens and persons living with disabilities have been left out due to accessibility factors: complex human interfaces difficult to understand and activate for persons with cognitive impairments or learning disabilities, lack of alternative communications for persons living with low vision, blind, hard of hearing or deaf, or, quite often handset ergonomics too difficult for persons with physical disabilities such as dexterity or mobility limitations.

This report contains references to the new legislative and regulatory framework set by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, an important resource for policy makers. It also covers practical elements required for a successful implementation of those programs and policies.

Download report.