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Category: Case studies
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M-Care logo

M-Care (Mobile Training for Home and Health Caregiver For People with Disabilities and Older People – http://mcare-project.eu/) has just released its pan-European survey among current or potential personal care givers (PCGs) in Turkey, Bulgaria, Belgium, Germany and Greece. In addition, they also contact people with disabilities (PwD), older people, family members of PwD, policy makers, training/VET centres and care centres in order to:

  • identify the needs of the project’s end-users (personal caregivers for people with disabilities and/or older people) and beneficiaries (PwD, older people, family members, stakeholders).
  • obtain a good perception of the need for adjustments in existing PCG training practices to enable the trainees (users) and beneficiaries to achieve personal accomplishment and satisfaction.
  • define a set of learning activities appropriate to and usable across a range of identified user needs.
  • gain familiarity with the nature and potential value of adjustments in training methods and in learning strategies to meet the needs of end-users and beneficiaries.
  • identify and highlight similarities and differences between national contexts in the partner countries.

English

Turkish

German

Dutch

Greek

Bulgarian

This project (M-Care – 539913-LLP-1-2013-1-TR-LEONARDO-LMP) has been funded with support from the European Commission. This website reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

In 2014, disabled people continue to face challenges in many areas of their lives. Many of these challenges involve attitudes. But what do attitudes towards disabled people currently look like? This report brings together a range of research that Scope has commissioned over the last two years to understand current attitudes towards disability and disabled people.

This also has a direct impact towards employability.

You can download the report here (pdf).

As reported on in http://www.scope.org.uk/About-Us/Research-and-Policy/Publication-directory/Current-attitudes-towards-disabled-people.

Having recently learnt about bad practices in the provision of care-services for people with disabilities in Belgium, France and Romania, the European Association of Service Providers for Persons with Disabilities (EASPD) highlights the need to monitor the quality standards of all types of social service provision in Europe and calls on the EU institutions to provide a technical response to avoid more scandals in the future as well as a political reaction based on a public hearing in the European Parliament.

Some European media have recently published that over 6.000 French persons with disabilities have been obliged to go to Belgian centers to receive care services due to a lack of such services in France. To make the situation even worst, some of these Belgium centers do not have the adequate infrastructure and lack sufficient trained staff to provide the necessary quality services. In addition, it has also come to our notice that cases of abuse have recently come to light in some Romanian centers, including at least two financed by EU structural funds. Thus, there are serious doubts regarding the availability and quality of the services which are provided in EU countries. There is also a growing criticism from Civil Society on the lack of action taken so far by public authorities to prevent these situations and comply with their Human Rights commitments; in the case of Romania, by the EU financing abuse in such residences.

According to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD), ratified by the three countries as well as concluded by the EU, persons with disabilities have the right to live independently and receive appropriate community-based services. An important aspect of quality service provision is that people with disabilities should be supported within their community; yet in the case of France, families were only really offered the possibility to receive services in another country, far away from their homes. Excellence and high quality services have to become common practice, being both inclusive and tailored to the individual needs.

From the Black Sea to the North Sea, more and more cases are coming to light. According to EASPD, this situation shows how important it is to support and help national, regional and local service providers and public authorities in the development of a community-based care system. EASPD, as a network of service providers is committed to help all organisations in their transition process by providing them the required expertise to promote the transition towards community-based services.

EASPD calls the EU institutions to address these problems by:

  • Organising a Public Hearing on the matter by the European Parliament, involving public authorities, service providers, Organisations representing disabled people, civil society and experts at all levels.
  • Ensuring by all means possible that structural funds are used to support the transition towards community-based services.  This will only happen if NGOs are actively involved in the planning of the national operational programmes as agreed by Member States in the new rules governing the EU Cohesion Policy for the period 2014-2020.
  • Ensuring that the European Disability Strategy is taken into account in the European Semester process to ensure dialogue between the national and European levels on the actions they are taking to fully implement the UN CRPD.

European Association of Service providers for Persons with Disabilities

EASPD, a non-profit NGO in the disability sector, promotes the views of over 10, 000 social services and their umbrella associations. There are over 80 million people with a disability throughout Europe. The main objective of EASPD is to promote equal opportunities for people with disabilities through effective and high-quality service systems

For more information, please contact:

Nieves Tejada Castro
Communications Officer
T. +32 2 282 46 18
Nieves.tejada@easpd.eu
www.easpd.eu

Luk Zelderloo
Secretary General
T. +32 2 282 46 10
luk.zelderloo@easpd.eu
www.easpd.eu

ITAG14: 7th Interactive Technologies and Games - Education, Health and Disability Conference
The Council House, Nottingham
16 – 17 October 2014

Now in its seventh consecutive year, ITAG aims to bring together academics, developers, beneficiaries and practitioners to explore interactive technologies and innovate within the areas of Education, Health and Disability.

ITAG will consist of 4 strands: Paper Presentations, Practical Workshops, Hackathon and Exhibition. Submissions are solicited on new research results and detailed interactive expositions related to ITAG, including but not limited to:

Mobile Gaming, Immersive Gaming, Rehabilitation Gaming, Games in Assistive Care, Artificial Intelligence in Games, Robotics in a Gaming Environment, Interactive design with new input/output devices, Ubiquitous computing on our everyday well-being, Interactive street gaming using mobile gaming applications, Gaming Hardware and Software to implement accessible solutions.

Read the call for papers for more information on themes and topics.

Successful paper submissions will be published through IEEE-XploreTM and the IEEE Computer Society (CSDL) digital libraries which deliver full text access to the world’s highest quality technical literature in engineering and technology.

What to do next

Prospective authors are invited to submit a maximum of 500 words abstract for a full paper and 300 words for a poster using the ITAG Abstract Submission Form’ attached to mail you send to itag@ntu.ac.uk by Monday 28 April 2014. Full papers in Conference Publishing Services (CPS) format should not exceed 8 pages in length, while posters should not exceed 4 pages in length. The papers will be reviewed for technical merit and content and the accepted papers will appear in the proceedings, to be published by CPS. Accepted publications are submitted for indexing through  IEEE-XploreTM and the IEEE Computer Society (CSDL) digital libraries. Publication templates are available for LaTeX and MS Word.

Key Dates

Abstract Due Date: Monday 28 April 2014
Full Paper Submission Due Date: Monday 2 June 2014
Notification: Monday 7 July 2014
Camera-Ready Due Date: Monday 21 July 2014
Submission opening: Tuesday 29 April 2014.

The Economist released a worldwide study based on interviews with experts on the digital divide, and the findings included some brand new conclusions. Although many are still urging public sector subsidies to roll out more broadband facilities, the real barriers to adoption and use may arise elsewhere — the ‘social divide’. Large proportions of people not using the Internet do not yet see its value (because good relevance arguments have not been made to them) or believe that they lack the skills (because good digital literacy programs are not available to them). Among these are people with disabilities; the report quotes Axel Leblois of the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict): “Among governments, there has been great focuson expanding the infrastructure to all corners of the world, but less so on promoting actual usage among disenfranchised populations.”
Source: Global Public Inclusive Infrastructure (GPII)

Actual tests of websites on e-accessibility in all EU member states plus Norway, USA, Canada and Australia took place, and were published.

The report is based on the international guidelines WCAG 2.0. This means that the study mainly concerns the technology and doesn’t cover cognitive aspects, content or on how interfaces work on mobile devices nor the accessibility in documents. The report thus can’t be read as an absolute measure of web-accessibility, but more like a temperature check based on cluster sampling.

The overall result of the survey is a disappointment. Relatively easy things fail in many places, for example marking up the headings properly. More recent requirements, which came with WCAG 2.0 in 2008, are even less implemented.

There are differences between the countries, but, there is no country which can be described as good. We were hoping that the EU member states would learn from each other and be inspired from good examples, but that doesn´t seem to be the case.

One conclusion is that the most successful countries are those who have managed to combine several things:
- Legislation or policy which is not too technically detailed but more focused on individual rights;
- A well developed industry with a high level of accessibility competence, also among end user organizations.