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Category: Case studies

Since November 2014, the incluD-ed Network has been working on the
pilot study “Quality Factors of Inclusive Education in Europe. An
Exploration”. The study aims to explore the quality of inclusive
processes in inclusive schools in several European countries, taking
into account elements relating to culture, policies and practices as
well as elements relating to available human and material resources.
Inclusive education, with its overall objective to meet the common and
special needs of students, is a demanding process in which these two
types of elements combine.

The pilot study will be conducted in the four European countries of
incluD-ed‘s founding members (Spain, France, Finland and the Czech
Republic) as well as in Austria, the UK, Ireland and Iceland where
incluD-ed counts with associated member organisations.
Jorge Calero Martínez, renowned expert in inclusive education from the
University of Barcelona (Spain), leads the theoretical and analytical
part of the study. incluD-ed Network expert María Antonia Casanova and
the incluD-ed Network Secretariat are responsible for validation and
practical aspects of the study such as the selection of school samples
that will respond to the study’s questionnaire. The study, under the
overall coordination of the incluD-ed leading team at Fundación ONCE,
will be the final publication of the incluD-ed Network.

More at http://includ-ed.eu/newsandevents/includ-ed-working-pilot-study-%E2%80%9Cquality-factors-inclusive-education-europe-exploration%E2%80%9D

DISCIT

DISCIT has published a new working paper on Diversity and Change of the Employment Prospects of Persons with Disabilities. The paper is the first output of Work Package 5 of the DISCIT study which focuses on the employment prospects of disabled persons in nine European countries. Taking article 27 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) as its focus, WP5 asks whether “the right of persons with disabilities to work, on an equal basis with others” is being made a reality. Whilst the main data, derived from interviews with disabled persons and other stakeholders in nine European countries, will form the basis of later papers, the present paper provides crucial context by bringing together currently available figures on labour market participation with data on the regulatory and redistributive measures that have so far structured that participation. It thus represents the initial phase in an effort to study how the employment prospects of disabled persons have been influenced by policy contexts which the Convention now informs. The countries selected represent different European welfare and policy traditions, allowing for key differences and similarities in provision and outcome to be explored. They include: Ireland, the UK, and Switzerland (Liberal); Norway and Sweden (Nordic); Germany and Italy (Conservative); and the Czech Republic and Serbia (Post-communist). By gathering data on the employment rates of persons with disabilities in each country, alongside information on the provisions available to help persons with disabilities into or to maintain them in work, the paper raises questions about the diverse contexts in which access to work for persons with disabilities has, to date, been sought. The purpose then is to think of the extent to which “equal” participation in the labour market may be achieved in policy contexts which are already well established.

The poor often pay more …

  • For food: Since they need to shop in nearby stores where prices are often higher.
  • For housing: Due to the lack of social homes, people with low income are forced to move into privately rented accommodation where they pay too much for a house of poor quality.
  • For energy: Since they often live in houses that are less energy-friendly or because they cannot afford energy-saving investments
  • For health care: Social determinants show a link between poverty and inferior health as a doctor’s consult is often postponed for cost reasons.
  • For loans: Since the less creditworthy pay higher interest rates. Provided they qualify for a loan,…
  • etc.

Community Service Engineering believes engineers and their analytical skills could contribute significantly to breaking the vicious cycle of poverty.

We go into this topic at the third conference in the pre-programme of Community Service Engineering.

More information on this webpage or in our folder.

Participation is free. Registration can be done via this link.

This is the schedule for Thursday 4th of September:

  • 18.30 h: Registration
  • 19.00 h: Word of Welcome – prof. dr. ir. Bart Vanrumste (KU Leuven) – Community Service Engineering
  • 19.10 h: Poverty: a multidimensional problem and policy challenge – prof. dr. Frank Vandenbroucke (KU Leuven)
  • 19.50 h: A view by an expert in the field of ‘Poverty’ – Henk Van Hootegem (Interfederal Support Centre for Poverty Reduction)
  • 20.30 h: Case 1 : Sustainable energy for families in poverty – prof.dr.ir. Griet Verbeeck (UHasselt)
  • 20.50 h: Case 2 : Web application REMI may allow uniformity in additional financial allowances – dr. Bérénice Storms (Thomas More – Cebud)
  • 21.10 h: Round table discussion in the auditorium

You are expected at 18.30 in the Auditorium Oude Molen, Kasteelpark Arenberg 50, 3001 Heverlee. We hope to meet you there!

Best regards,

Inge Vervoort

Project Director Community Service Engineering

cse@kuleuven.be

Please join us:

You can find all presentations and pictures of the first two conferences:

  1. Conference on the topic of ‘Ageing’ that took place on April 3th via this link.
  2. Conference on the topic of ‘Living with a disability’ that took place on May 21th via this link.

Community Service Engineering (CSE) is a continuing education curriculum of KU Leuven that lasts for 8 months (October 2014 – May 2015) for graduated engineers (or nearly graduated engineering students that only still need to finish their master’s thesis).More information on the CSE curriculum:

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you need more information.

M-Care logo

M-Care logo

M-Care (Mobile Training for Home and Health Caregiver For People with Disabilities and Older People – http://mcare-project.eu/) has just released its pan-European survey among current or potential personal care givers (PCGs) in Turkey, Bulgaria, Belgium, Germany and Greece. In addition, they also contact people with disabilities (PwD), older people, family members of PwD, policy makers, training/VET centres and care centres in order to:

  • identify the needs of the project’s end-users (personal caregivers for people with disabilities and/or older people) and beneficiaries (PwD, older people, family members, stakeholders).
  • obtain a good perception of the need for adjustments in existing PCG training practices to enable the trainees (users) and beneficiaries to achieve personal accomplishment and satisfaction.
  • define a set of learning activities appropriate to and usable across a range of identified user needs.
  • gain familiarity with the nature and potential value of adjustments in training methods and in learning strategies to meet the needs of end-users and beneficiaries.
  • identify and highlight similarities and differences between national contexts in the partner countries.

English

Turkish

German

Dutch

Greek

Bulgarian

This project (M-Care – 539913-LLP-1-2013-1-TR-LEONARDO-LMP) has been funded with support from the European Commission. This website reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

In 2014, disabled people continue to face challenges in many areas of their lives. Many of these challenges involve attitudes. But what do attitudes towards disabled people currently look like? This report brings together a range of research that Scope has commissioned over the last two years to understand current attitudes towards disability and disabled people.

This also has a direct impact towards employability.

You can download the report here (pdf).

As reported on in http://www.scope.org.uk/About-Us/Research-and-Policy/Publication-directory/Current-attitudes-towards-disabled-people.

Having recently learnt about bad practices in the provision of care-services for people with disabilities in Belgium, France and Romania, the European Association of Service Providers for Persons with Disabilities (EASPD) highlights the need to monitor the quality standards of all types of social service provision in Europe and calls on the EU institutions to provide a technical response to avoid more scandals in the future as well as a political reaction based on a public hearing in the European Parliament.

Some European media have recently published that over 6.000 French persons with disabilities have been obliged to go to Belgian centers to receive care services due to a lack of such services in France. To make the situation even worst, some of these Belgium centers do not have the adequate infrastructure and lack sufficient trained staff to provide the necessary quality services. In addition, it has also come to our notice that cases of abuse have recently come to light in some Romanian centers, including at least two financed by EU structural funds. Thus, there are serious doubts regarding the availability and quality of the services which are provided in EU countries. There is also a growing criticism from Civil Society on the lack of action taken so far by public authorities to prevent these situations and comply with their Human Rights commitments; in the case of Romania, by the EU financing abuse in such residences.

According to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD), ratified by the three countries as well as concluded by the EU, persons with disabilities have the right to live independently and receive appropriate community-based services. An important aspect of quality service provision is that people with disabilities should be supported within their community; yet in the case of France, families were only really offered the possibility to receive services in another country, far away from their homes. Excellence and high quality services have to become common practice, being both inclusive and tailored to the individual needs.

From the Black Sea to the North Sea, more and more cases are coming to light. According to EASPD, this situation shows how important it is to support and help national, regional and local service providers and public authorities in the development of a community-based care system. EASPD, as a network of service providers is committed to help all organisations in their transition process by providing them the required expertise to promote the transition towards community-based services.

EASPD calls the EU institutions to address these problems by:

  • Organising a Public Hearing on the matter by the European Parliament, involving public authorities, service providers, Organisations representing disabled people, civil society and experts at all levels.
  • Ensuring by all means possible that structural funds are used to support the transition towards community-based services.  This will only happen if NGOs are actively involved in the planning of the national operational programmes as agreed by Member States in the new rules governing the EU Cohesion Policy for the period 2014-2020.
  • Ensuring that the European Disability Strategy is taken into account in the European Semester process to ensure dialogue between the national and European levels on the actions they are taking to fully implement the UN CRPD.

European Association of Service providers for Persons with Disabilities

EASPD, a non-profit NGO in the disability sector, promotes the views of over 10, 000 social services and their umbrella associations. There are over 80 million people with a disability throughout Europe. The main objective of EASPD is to promote equal opportunities for people with disabilities through effective and high-quality service systems

For more information, please contact:

Nieves Tejada Castro
Communications Officer
T. +32 2 282 46 18
Nieves.tejada@easpd.eu
www.easpd.eu

Luk Zelderloo
Secretary General
T. +32 2 282 46 10
luk.zelderloo@easpd.eu
www.easpd.eu