Skip to content

Archive

Archive for August, 2013

Individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and their families have new expectations for life after high school, including attending college, becoming employed, managing personal assistance services and transportation, and having intimate relations. However, the vocabulary needed to support these socially-valued adult roles is frequently not be available in pre-programmed devices nor in commonly used visual symbol systems. This website contains vocabulary needed to participate in 8 socially-valued adult roles:
– College Life
– Emergency Preparedness
– Employment
– Sexuality, Intimacy, and Sex
– Reporting Crime and Abuse
– Managing Personal Assistance Services
– Managing Health Care, and
– Using Transportation

Recommended read: Lewthwaite, Sarah (2011) Disability 2.0, student dis/connections: a study of student experiences of disability and social networks on campus in higher education. PhD thesis, University of Nottingham.

Abstract: For many young people, social networks are an essential part of their student experience. Using a Foucauldian perspective, this qualitative study explores the networked experiences of disabled students to examine how dis/ability difference is ascribed and negotiated within social networks. Data comprises 34 internet-enabled interviews with 18 participants from three English universities. Accessible field methods recognise participant preferences and circumstances. Data is analysed using discourse analysis, with an attention to context framed by activity theory.

Disabled students’ networked experiences are found to be complex and diverse. For a proportion, the network shifts the boundaries of disability, creating non-disabled subjectivities. For these students, the network represents the opportunity to mobilise new ways of being, building social capital and mitigating impairment.

Other participants experience the network as punitive and disabling. Disability is socio-technically ascribed by the social networking site and the networked public. Each inducts norms that constitute disability as a visible, deviant and deficit identity. In the highly normative conditions of the network, where every action is open to scrutiny, impairment is subjected to an unequal gaze that produces disabled subjectivities. For some students with unseen impairments, a social experience of disability is inducted for the first time.

As a result, students deploy diverse strategies to retain control and resist deviant status. Self-surveillance, self-discipline and self-advocacy are evoked, each involving numerous social, cognitive and technological tactics for self-determination, including disconnection. I conclude that networks function both as Technologies of the Self and as Technologies of Power. For some disabled students, the network supports ‘normal’ status. For others, it must be resisted as a form of social domination.

Importantly, in each instance, the network propels students towards disciplinary techniques that mask diversity, rendering disability and the possibility of disability invisible. Consequently, disability is both produced and suppressed by the network.

Public conference of the EuCAN – European Concept for Accessibility Network to launch the new ECA publication: “ECA 2013 – From theory to practice”.

In cooperation with the Senate Department for Urban Development and the Environment Berlin, the Fürst Donnersmarck-Foundation, Berlinische Galerie and Design for All – Germany (EDAD)

Venue: Berlinische Galerie – Museum of Modern Art, Photography and Architecture
Alte Jakobstraße 124-128
10969 Berlin
Deutschland
www.berlinischegalerie.de
Date:7th and 8th November 2013
Conference language: English
Audience: Members of the organisers and other interested persons from Europe, with a particular focus on representatives active in the following fields: (environmental) architecture, construction, city planning, crafts, marketing, design, art, culture, communication, entrepreneurship, consumer organisations, organisations of and for Senior citizens and/or people with disabilities, Highschools, training institutes and decision makers in economy, policy and administration.
Accomodations: Advance bookings have been made in Grimm’s Hotel and Best Western Hotel am Spittelmarkt. There are special offers for the attendances of the conference. Please send an email to eca@eca.lu (after September 9th) if you are interested to book a room.
Deadline: Deadline to register for the conference and the hotel rooms: September 30th.
Contact: Silvio Sagramola, eca@eca.lu