Skip to content

Archive

Archive for September, 2012

The RECALL Stakeholder Event takes place at the Deaf Cultural Centre, Ladywood Road, Birmingham B16 8SZ, on 16th October, 2012 from 9:30am – 12:30pm (lunch included).

Route Mate is an Android application that uses location-based services (e.g. GPS & Google Maps) to help route learning for people with intellectual disabilities and/or additional sensory impairments. The application allows students to plan their own journeys with the help of a trainer. They can plan destination/departure points, points of interest on route, enter the number of an emergency contact and practise walking routes until they become familiar with them.
Route Mate is developed by experts at Nottingham Trent University and tested by people with a range of disabilities across the partner organisations of UK, Greece, Romania & Bulgaria.

Programme

  • 9:30am: Arrival, registration & refreshments
  • 10:00am: Welcome & overview of the project
  • 10:15am – 11am: Demonstration by application developer
  • 11:30am – 12pm: Workshop activities
  • 12:00pm: Lunch & networking

Who should attend?: Are you involved in supporting students to gain independent travel skills? Do you work with students who have always been provided transport and now need extra support before accessing college or employment? This is the event for you.
Why should I attend?: Free route planning software, see a demonstration of the technology, talk to the developers, users and testers.

There is no charge to attend the exhibition, but as places are limited, those wishing to attend should contact Jo Reilly by email at jo.reilly@bid.org.uk for a booking form as soon as possible. Please note there are no walk-ins permitted.

Visit http://recall-project.eu and http://isrg.org.uk for further information about this project.

The AbleGamers Foundation is pleased to announce the unveiling of Includification – a 48 page, fully illustrated how-to guide for videogame developers and publishers road-mapping the exact solutions needed to design an accessible game.
“For nearly a decade, our organization has been reaching out to developers convincing them they need to include accessibility for gamers with disabilities,” said Mark Barlet, President and Founder of the AbleGamers Foundation. “As that message has been increasingly accepted in the video game industry, the question has slowly turned into “Okay, we need to make our games accessible, but how?””
“We believe this document and its companion website www.includification.com will serve to answer any questions a developer might have about the solutions needed to make their games accessible to the disability community,” continued Mr. Barlet. “What thrills me the most is that our recommendations can be updated via the website as new technology and information arises. The videogame industry is a living breathing entity and we need to treat it as such by updating information as it comes in.”
“Words cannot express how extremely proud I am of this document, this organization and everyone who helped bring this together. This is the culmination of the hard work and dedication everyone at our nonprofit has put in over the last 8 years,” said Steve Spohn, Editor-in-Chief of AbleGamers.com “It is my sincerest wish that a copy of this document sits on the desk of every developer, in the resource area of every library and with every major publisher across the world. It’s time game accessibility leaped to the next level and these guidelines show developers exactly how to enable gamers with disabilities in the easiest, most efficient and cost-effective manner possible.”

The AbleGamers publication, Includification, includes numerous detailed explanations of common problems for gamers with disabilities, solutions for those problems, printable checklists, developer exercises and personal letters from industry insiders to the game industry.
Download Includification for free.

The 2012 CRPD Progress Report includes the latest data on 52 countries representing 77.4 percent of the World Population. The report offers disability advocates, governments, civil society and international organizations — monitoring the progress of the implementation of the Convention by States Parties — a unique benchmarking tool that collects data on country laws, policies, and programs pertaining to accessible and assistive Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) around the globe. All results are available cross-tabulated by region, level of income per capita of Human Development Index to facilitate benchmarking by advocates and policy makers.

Which course?

Training of trainers to provide basic ICT skills’ education to people with disabilities, taking on board their specific needs.

Is it good for me?

Target audience:

  • Teachers (Pre-school, primary, secondary, vocational, adult, special needs)
  • Teacher trainers
  • Careers officers, educational guides and counsellors
  • Inspectors
  • Headteachers/principals/managers of schools/organisations offering adult education
  • Other (Paid or voluntary) management staff in the institution/organisation
  • Non-teaching administrative staff
  • Members of students/teachers councils in adult education
  • Representative organizations of persons with disabilities

Hmm…what is it about?

The objectives of the training course are:

  • To offer an inclusive approach to teaching, learning and assessment of (accessible) basic ICT skills, aiming at inclusive education (people with disabilities within regular education) and have this inclusive approach also embedded in daily teaching practices;
  • To help trainees understand the basic ICT challenges but also competences related to disabilities;
  • To help trainees understand and implement the teaching of basic ICT skills to people with disabilities and how to accommodate for them;
  • To help trainees understand the cultural and social differences linked to people with disabilities coming from different backgrounds (e.g. migrants, refugees, ethnic communities, people from outside Europe or intra-EU mobility);
  • To help trainees experience, through visits to local VET centres, how local organizations for people with disabilities, as well as disabled individuals themselves, address the issues of acquiring basic ICT skills and how this can consequently improve their employability potential;
  • To help trainees acquire hands-on experience by role-playing in implementing accessible teaching practices.

What language?

English will be the main teaching language, however, supportive material will be available in Dutch, English, Greek and Lithuanian!

Where?

Four options!

  • 1st SESSION: Larnaca, Cyprus, on 11-15 March 2013. Register by 25/02/2013!
  • 2nd SESSION: Ypres region, Belgium, on 20-24 May 2013. Register by 16/05/2013!
  • 3rd SESSION: Vilnius, Lithuania, on 01-05 July 2013. Register by 17/06/2013!
  • 4th SESSION: Nottingham, UK, on 14-18 October 2013. Register by 30/09/2013!

Further information?

You may find all details about the course at the address http://ec.europa.eu/education/trainingdatabase/index.cfm?fuseaction=DisplayCourse&cid=34259 , including the full programme, organizers, fees and sessions’ details.

Do I get any certificate for participation?

Yes, you will receive an attendance certificate based on the Europass Mobility certificate template.

Interesting! How can I register?

1. Please, first book your place and receive a written pre-registration confirmation as soon as possible, by sending a message to the addresses given below. Applicants from outside the session’s host country are treated favourably (due to Grundtvig regulations only 1/3 of the participants can be from the hosting country).

PRE-REGISTRATIONS FOR UPCOMING SESSIONS:

2. Apply for a grant! Only if you are not from the hosting country, you may apply for funding to cover your travelling, accommodation and meals, as well as, participation fees. Find your National Agency at http://ec.europa.eu/education/lifelong-learning-programme/national_en.htm and follow the procedure to apply for a Grundtvig In-service Training grant! This option is now open for the 1st SESSION. You may check regularly for new calls for applications that will cover the next three sessions. Depending on your eligibility and application evaluation, you can get as much as € 2500 that will cover almost all your participation expenses.

3. As soon as you have secured funding by your Lifelong Learning National Agency or you have made your final decision to participate on your own expenses, please, get back to the hosting organization (same contact details as given above for pre-registrations) and confirm your registration! Make sure to complete the whole procedure before the relevant deadline for each session, given above.

We will be happy to help you at any step of the above procedure. Please, do not hesitate to contact us asking for clarification and help at the contact details given above.

Looking forward to welcoming you to one of our sessions!

The Interactive Technologies and Games Conference (ITAG) brings together academics and practitioners who work with interactive technologies to explore and innovate within the areas of Education, Health and Disability.

ITAG2012 banner

ITAG2012 banner

The Conference provides an excellent opportunity to showcase practice and to mainstream research ideas and outcomes. It introduces a wider audience to key findings and products and illustrates how practice feeds back into and informs research. The conference creates a forum for two-way communication between the academic and practitioner communities and particularly welcomes user led presentations and workshops.
For full details of papers, please see the conference schedule.

Date: Tuesday 23 and Wednesday 24 October 2012
Venue: Nottingham Conference Centre, Nottingham
Day 1: 8.30 am – 6.30 pm
Day 2: 9.00 am – 3.30 pm
Conference rate (both days):
Standard – £150.00
Concessions – £75.00
ISVR Members – £125.00
Daily rate:
Standard – £80.00
Concessions – £45.00
ISVR Members – £67.50

Find out how to become an ISVR member.

Book ITAG Conference online.

Bubbly is a new social media tool that lets users record and forward voice messages to their ‘followers’ — it’s like Twitter, but by voice instead of text (although you can share text messages with Bubbly as well). Since there’s no reading or text entry involved, and no computer or smartphone is required, it may be a way for many new people to social network.